«

»

Mar 20 2019

FDA Approval of New Opioid Drug (DSUVIATM) Stirs Controversy – Is it Necessary or Not?

By Dieanira Erudaitius, Ph.D., Scientist at Cato Research

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted approval of the opioid analgesic DSUVIATM on 02 November 2018.[[1]] Its intended use is for adults only where acute pain management has no alternative treatment other than an opioid analgesic.

DSUVIATM is a sublingual tablet containing sufentanil as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), a Schedule II controlled substance.[[2]] Sufentanil is an analogue of fentanyl; however, unlike fentanyl that has a potency of 100 times that of morphine, sufentanil is 1,000 times more potent.[[3]] While its potency raises concerns regarding addiction and misuse, advocates for the drug point out that sufentanil is currently already used in the hospital setting where it is intravenously delivered. Intravenous delivery (i.v.) of opioids does provide advantages such as providing immediate relief to the patient; however, it also has risks associated with dosing (e.g., issues have been reported of overdosing the patient).[[4]] DSUVIATM is unique because of its alternative sublingual oral form of delivery [[5]], which advocates argue is more easily controlled for dosing.

Opioids, regardless of the potency, raise concerns because of the risks associated with addiction, abuse, and misuse. Opponents to DSUVIATM’s approval point out that the pill form of the opioid makes it easily divertible. Illicit diversion is not at all uncommon, and is especially a problem for opioids.[3] While the FDA does not have a way to control or prevent this specific type of abuse, the agency did put strong limitations on its use. The FDA required an additional Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) from the manufacturer to ensure any risk from accidental exposure is adequately controlled.[[6]] Further, DSUVIATM has been approved for use only in certified, medically-supervised healthcare settings. These settings include emergency rooms (ERs), hospitals, and surgical centers where a certified healthcare provider is to administer the drug.[2]

Many medical experts and advocates in favor of opioid control question whether there was really a need to bring an additional opioid drug to the market. A common argument for the need of a more potent opioid is that oligoanalgesia (the inadequate treatment of pain) does remain a prominent issue in the hospital setting, especially for patients admitted to the ER. Proponents believe that there is not only a need for an opioid strong enough to alleviate such pain but opioids have the potential to be more beneficial than harmful when controlled and monitored appropriately.[[7]] DSUVIATM is targeted at a population where opioid analgesic treatment is required but i.v. administration is not feasible and oral delivery is impractical (e.g., patient can’t swallow).[[8]] Additionally it is argued that the dissolving sublingual tablet is superior to current methods of opioid delivery because the absorption is prolonged resulting in longer analgesia treatment.[8] The Department of Defense (DOD) provided funding support for DSUVIATM with the primary interest of aiding U.S. soldiers wounded in battle. Scott Gottlieb, commissioner of the FDA from 2010 to 2019, supported the approval stating on Twitter that “[w]hile DSUVIATM brings another highly-potent opioid to market it fulfills a limited, unmet medical need.” The unmet need refers to soldiers who often do not have access to intravenous treatment on the battlefield, making an equally potent tablet form necessary for the initial treatment of battlefield injuries.

The indications and usage of DSUVIATM, however, do not explicitly limit use to the soldier population. Like most drugs, it will be left to the discretion of the medical professionals administering the drug, thus increasing the population of patients that may be exposed to such a potent opioid. Critics question whether the FDA should have approved such a drug in the current climate of opioid abuse striking our nation. Dr. Raeford E. Brown, chair of the FDA’s Advisory Committee on Analgesic Drug Products, expressed his concerns in a statement to the FDA arguing that over the past 10 years there has been no historical proof of successful control over any of the marketed opioids nor sufficient data demonstrating their safety.[3]

Scott Gottlieb addressed the controversy around the new opioid approval by explaining that the FDA approves drugs when the benefits outweigh the risks and when there is sufficient evidence for the safety and efficacy for use of the drug in humans.[1] Table 1 lists a brief comparison between the different views (critics vs. advocates) for DSUVIATM.

Table 1. Comparison of views presented by critics and advocates of DSUVIATM.

Topic Critics of DSUVIATM Advocates for DSUVIATM
Method of delivery ·         Increases likelihood of illicit diversion (small pill)

·         Abuse by healthcare individuals is not uncommon

·         Improves dosing control

·         Noninvasive

·         Brings treatment for unmet population of patients unable to take i.v. and oral tablet

Pharmacological potency

(API – sufentanil)

·         1,000 times more potent than morphine

·         Highly addictive

·         Irrelevant because API is currently used intravenously in hospital settings
Opioid crisis and health of the general population ·         Approval increases the risk of abuse, addiction, and misuse (e.g., fentanyl is produced illicitly and contributes to many deaths)

·         No historical proof of FDAs ability to enforce control

·         No post-marketing assessment

·         REMS program for opioids

·         Specific regulation defined for use of DSUVIATM to prevent risks (e.g., only available in hospital setting making accessibility to the general public limited)

·         Usage has limit of 72 hours maximum

 

Meets an unmet need ·         Benefits don’t outweigh the risk, when potent opioids are already on the market ·         Provides management of extreme pain (e.g., soldiers)

·         Years since any new opioid has been brought to the market

 

There has also been talk about AcelRx Pharmaceuticals (the company that developed and commercialized DSUVIATM in the United States) looking for a Canadian partner to obtain approval for the opioid through Health Canada.[[9]] This is alarming considering Canada’s opioid crisis is also on the rise. The Canadian government is specifically concerned with the harm caused by opioids, including fentanyl, and have taken federal action to control opioid substance abuse.[[10]] A number of medical professionals are urging Health Canada to carefully consider such an approval as it brings a large risk to the general public.[9]

In summary, the FDA approved a new form of a potent analgesic opioid for a population of adults requiring strong medication to relieve pain. The question as to whether placing another opioid on the market was necessary is surrounded by a strong controversy. The main concerns are (1) whether the needs of those with acute uncontrolled pain who will benefit from the medication are outweighed by the government’s responsibility to protect the society as a whole and (2) is the REMS for DSUVIATM (or any opioid/drug) adequate to address the potential risks of abuse.

 

L’Approbation d’un nouvel Opioïde (DSUVIATM) par la FDA qui fait controverse – Est-ce que c’est nécessaire?  

Par Dieanira Erudaitius, Ph.D., Scientifique à Cato Research

Le 02 novembre 2018, l’Agence Américaine des Produits Alimentaires et Médicamenteux (ci-après FDA) aux États-Unis a approuvé l’analgésique opioïde DSUVIATM.[[11]] L’utilisation prévue de ce médicament est réservée aux adultes pour lesquels aucun traitement pour la douleur aiguë, autre que les opiacés, n’est disponible.

DSUVIATM est un comprimé sublingual contenant l’ingrédient pharmaceutique actif sufentanil, une substance contrôlée inscrite à l’annexe II de la United States Controlled Substances Act.[[12]] Sufentanil est un analogue de fentanyl; mais contrairement au fentanyl, qui est 100 fois plus puissant que la morphine, sufentanil est 1,000 fois plus puissant.[[13]] Cela soulève d’importantes inquiétudes concernant des problèmes d’abus et de dépendance. Malgré cela, les promoteurs signalent que le sufentanil est déjà utilisé dans le contexte hospitalier avec la distinction que la drogue est administrée par voie intraveineuse. En effet, l’administration intraveineuse des opioïdes peut fournir un soulagement immédiat aux patients, mais aussi augmenter les risques de surdosage.[[14]] DSUVIATM étant administré par voie sublinguale [[15]], les partisans affirment qu’il est plus facile de contrôler le dosage.

Sans égard à leur puissance, les opioïdes peuvent poser de graves problèmes de santé aux patients à cause des risques associés à la dépendance, l’abus, et l’usage inadéquat de la drogue. Les opposants à l’approbation de DSUVIATM informent aussi que la petite taille du comprimé facilite le détournement illicite ce qui n’est pas inhabituel et constitue un grave problème pour cette classe d’agent pharmacologique.[3] La FDA n’a pas la capacité de contrôler ou prévenir ce type d’abus, mais ils ont imposé des conditions d’utilisation strictes. Par conséquent, un programme complémentaire sous le nom « Stratégie d’évaluation et d’atténuation des risques » (REMS, son acronyme en anglais) a été mis en place pour garantir que les risques d’exposition accidentelle sont limités.[[16]] En outre, DSUVIATM at été approuvé uniquement pour l’usage dans les centres médicaux supervisés, ce qui comprend les salles d’urgence, les hôpitaux, et les centres de chirurgie où un professionnel de la santé doit administrer la drogue.[2]

De nombreux experts médicaux et de partisans d’un contrôle plus stricte des opioïdes questionnent la nécessité d‘un autre opioïde sur le marché. Un argument couramment invoqué pour justifier le besoin d’une opioïde puissante est celui de l’  « oligoanalgesia » (le traitement inadéquat de la douleur) qui demeure une priorité des services de santé, notamment pour les patients admis aux urgences. Les promoteurs suggèrent qu’il existe toujours un besoin pour des opioïdes suffisamment fort pour soulager adéquatement la douleur et que les opioïdes peuvent présenter l’avantage d’être plus bénéfiques que néfastes quand ils sont rigoureusement contrôlés et surveillés.[[17]] DSUVIATM est destinée aux patients qui nécessitent une analgésie opioïde mais pour lesquels une administration intraveineuse ou orale n’est pas possible (par exemple, un patient n’arrivant pas à avaler).[[18]] De plus, on fait valoir que la formulation en comprimé sublingual à dissolution rapide de DSUVIATM rend ce produit supérieur à d’autres méthodes d’administration puisque que son absorption prolongée entraine également une analgésie prolongée.[8] Le Département de la Défense a fourni un financement pour appuyer le développement de cette drogue afin d’aider les soldats blessés. Scott Gottlieb, commissaire de la FDA de 2010 à 2019, a plaidé en faveur de l’approbation de DSUVIATM. Il a déclaré sur son compte Twitter qu’ « Alors que DSUVIATM apporte un autre opioïde extrêmement puissant sur le marché, il répond à un besoin médical insatisfait » Ce besoin médical insatisfait concerne le traitement des soldats qui souvent n’ont pas accès au traitement intraveineux. Il est donc nécessaire d’avoir une drogue sous forme de comprimés qui est aussi puissante afin de donner les premiers soins aux soldats sur un champ de bataille.

Cependant, l’indication de DSUVIATM n’est pas expressément limitée aux soldats. Comme pour la plupart des médicaments, la décision de prescrire ce nouvel opioïde, et d’ainsi accroitre la population exposée à un produit particulièrement puissant, demeure à la discrétion du médecin traitant. Les critiques questionnent la décision de la FDA d’approuver un tel médicament dans un climat marqué par les problèmes liés à la dépendance et abus d’opioïdes. Dr. Raeford E. Brown, président du comité consultatif sur les analgésiques de la FDA, a exprimé ses préoccupations dans une déclaration à la FDA dans laquelle il souligne qu’au cours de la dernière décennie, il n’y a aucune démonstration qu’un contrôle adéquat n’ait été exercé sur les opioïdes disponibles sur le marché ou qu’il existe suffisamment de données pour démontrer la sécurité de ces produits.[3]

Scott Gottlieb a répondu à la controverse entourant l’approbation de ce nouvel opioïde en expliquant que la FDA approuve les médicaments si les avantages surpassent les risques et s’il existe des éléments de preuve suffisants pour soutenir l’utilisation, la sécurité, et l’efficacité de la drogue.[1] Une brève comparaison entre les points de vue exprimés par ces deux positions (partisans et détracteurs) est fournie dans le Tableau 1.

Tableau 1. Comparaison entre les deux groups.

Sujet Les Critiques de DSUVIATM Les Promoteurs de DSUVIATM
Le mode d’administration ·         Accroît la probabilité de détournements illicites (une petite pilule)

·         L’abus par les professionnels de la santé n’est pas rare

·         La précision de dosage s’améliorera

·         Non invasive

·         Il offre de traitements aux patients qui sont incapable d’avaler un comprimé et administration intraveineuse n’est pas une solution

La puissance pharmacologique (ingrédient pharmaceutique actif – sufentanil) ·         1,000 fois plus puissant que la morphine

·         Il crée une forte dépendance

·         Non pertinent parce que l’ingrédient pharmaceutique actif est actuellement utilisé à l’hôpital par voie intraveineuse
L’abus d’opioïdes et la santé de la population en général ·         L’approbation augmente considérablement les risques entourant l’abus, d’accoutumance, et de mésusage (par exemple fentanyl est illicitement produite et il contribue aussi à de nombreux décès)

·         Il n’y a aucune preuve historique démontrant la capacité de la FDA à assurer le contrôle

·         Pas d’évaluation postcommercialisation

·         Programme REMS pour des opioïdes

·         L’utilisation de DSUVIATM est restreinte à des instructions strictes afin de réduire les risques (par exemple, offert exclusivement en milieu hospitalier limitant ainsi l’accès au grand public)

·         L’utilisation de DSUVIATM est limitée à une période de 72 heures

Combler un besoin non satisfait ·         Les bénéfices ne sont pas supérieurs aux risques puisque d’autre opioïdes existent déjà sur le marché ·         Fournir une gestion de la douleur extrême (par exemple pour les soldats)

·         Plusieurs années depuis qu’un nouvel opioïde a été mis sur le marché

 

Il a également été rapporté qu’AcelRx Pharmaceuticals (l’entreprise qui a développé et commercialisé DSUVIATM aux États-Unis) est à la recherche d’un partenaire Canadien pour obtenir l’approbation de DSUVIATM par Santé Canada.[[19]] Ceci pourrait être encore plus alarmant pour certains si l’opioïde est approuvé, compte tenu de la crise des opioïdes qui se fait également sentir au Canada. Le gouvernement canadien s’intéresse particulièrement aux dommages causés par les opioïdes, notamment le fentanyl, et le gouvernement fédéral a pris des mesures pour contrôler l’abus de cette substance à l’échelle nationale.[[20]] De nombreux professionnels de la santé incitent Santé Canada à considérer l’approbation de ce médicament avec précaution à cause des risques à la santé publique.[9]

En résumé, la FDA a approuvé un opioïde puissant sous forme de comprimés pour usage chez l’adulte qui a besoin de médicaments analgésiques pour la douleur. La question de savoir si ajouter un autre opioïde sur le marché est absolument nécessaire a suscité une discussion. Les considérations majeures sont: (1) Est-ce que les besoins du patient qui souffre de douleurs violentes dépassent la responsabilité du gouvernement à protéger la société entière et (2) Est-ce que le programme REMS pour DSUVIATM sera adéquat pour faire face aux risques potentiels d’abus?

 

[[1]] “Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on agency’s approval of Dsuvia and the FDA’s future consideration of new opioids”. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration. 02 November 2018.

[[2]] “Full Prescribing Information for Dsuvia” (2018) AcelRx Pharmaceutical, Inc.

[[3]] “For a Public Hearing on Fentanyl and Synthetic Cannabinoids” Statement by Tell, S.R. before the U.S. Sentencing Commission. 05 December 2017.

[[4]] Patanwala, A. E., Keim, S. M., and Erstad, B. L. (2010). Intravenous opioids for severe acute pain in the emergency department. Annals of Pharmacotherapy44(11), 1800-1809.

[[5]] “Dsuvia Direction for Use” (2018) AcelRx Pharmaceutical, Inc.

[[6]] “Approved Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS)”. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration. 02 November 2018.

[[7]] Motov and Khan (2009). Problems and barriers of pain management in the emergency department: Are we ever going to get better? Journal of Pain Research. 2: 5-11.

[[8]]  “Meeting of the anesthetic and analgesic drug products advisory committee”.  FDA Advisory Committee Briefing Document. 12 October 2018.

[[9]] “Canadian doctors urge caution after FDA approves controversial new opioid pill” CBC News. 07 November 2018.

[[10]] “Responding to Canada’s opioid crisis”. Government of Canada. 18 December 2018.

[[11]] “Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on agency’s approval of Dsuvia and the FDA’s future consideration of new opioids”. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration. 02 November 2018.

[[12]] “Full Prescribing Information for Dsuvia” (2018) AcelRx Pharmaceutical, Inc.

[[13]] “For a Public Hearing on Fentanyl and Synthetic Cannabinoids” Statement by Tell, S.R. before the U.S. Sentencing Commission. 05 December 2017.

[[14]] Patanwala, A. E., Keim, S. M., and Erstad, B. L. (2010). Intravenous opioids for severe acute pain in the emergency department. Annals of Pharmacotherapy44(11), 1800-1809.

[[15]] “Dsuvia Direction for Use” (2018) AcelRx Pharmaceutical, Inc.

[[16]] “Approved Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS)”. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration. 02 November 2018.

[[17]] Motov and Khan (2009). Problems and barriers of pain management in the emergency department: Are we ever going to get better? Journal of Pain Research. 2: 5-11.

[[18]] “Meeting of the anesthetic and analgesic drug products advisory committee”.  FDA Advisory Committee Briefing Document. 12 October 2018.

[[19]] “Canadian doctors urge caution after FDA approves controversial new opioid pill” CBC News. 07 November 2018.

[[20]] “Responding to Canada’s opioid crisis”. Government of Canada. 18 December 2018.